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Excerpt for Urban Air Mobility (UAM) - Are Flying Cars Ready for Take-Off? Benefits and Challenges of Personal, Autonomous Vertical Take-off and Landing Aircraft by Firms Including Uber, Bell, and Terrafugia by , available in its entirety at Smashwords

Urban Air Mobility (UAM) - Are Flying Cars Ready for Take-Off? Benefits and Challenges of Personal, Autonomous Vertical Take-off and Landing Aircraft by Firms Including Uber, Bell, and Terrafugia

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CONTENTS

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Urban Air Mobility (UAM) - Are Flying Cars Ready for Take-Off?

Testimony of Dr. Jaiwon Shin, Associate Administrator, Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate, NASA

Testimony of Dr. John-Paul Clarke, College of Engineering Dean's Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology

Testimony of Dr. Eric Allison, Head of Aviation Programs, Uber

Testimony of Mr. Michael Thacker, Executive Vice President, Technology and Innovation, Bell

Testimony of Ms. Anna Mracek Dietrich, Co-Founder and Regulatory Affairs, Terrafugia

Answers to Post-Hearing Questions

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Urban Air Mobility (UAM) - Are Flying Cars Ready for Take-Off?

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Hearing Before the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology

House of Representatives

One Hundred Fifteenth Congress

Second Session

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July 24, 2018

Serial No. 115-71

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Printed for the use of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology

The Committee met, pursuant to call, at 10:05 a.m., in Room 2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Lamar Smith

[Chairman of the Committee] presiding.

Urban Air Mobility - Are Flying Cars Ready for Take-Off?

Tuesday, July 24,2018 10:00 a.m. 2318 Rayburn House Office Building

Witnesses

Dr. Jaiwon Shin, Associate Administrator, Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate, NASA

Dr. John-Paul Clarke, College of Engineering Dean's Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology; Co-chair, 2014 National Research Council Committee on Autonomy Research for Civil Aviation

Dr. Eric Allison, Head of Aviation Programs, Uber

Mr. Michael Thacker, Executive Vice President, Technology and Innovation, Bell

Ms. Anna Mracek Dietrich, Co-Founder and Regulatory Affairs, Terrafugia

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Hearing Purpose

The purpose of the hearing is to learn about urban air mobility research and development efforts. The hearing will examine the potential benefits and challenges of 'flying cars' or vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircrafts from a public and private sector perspective, including discussion of when such technology may be commercially available.

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Witness List

• Dr. Jaiwon Shin, Associate Administrator, Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate, NASA

• Dr. John-Paul Clarke, College of Engineering Dean's Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology; Co-chair, 2014 National Research Council Committee on Autonomy Research for Civil Aviation

• Dr. Eric Allison, Head of Aviation Programs, Uber

• Mr. Michael Thacker, Executive Vice President, Technology and Innovation, Bell

• Ms. Anna Mracek Dietrich, Co-Founder and Regulatory Affairs, Terrafugia

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Chairman Smith. The Committee on Space, Science, and Technology will come to order. Without objection, the Chair is authorized to declare recesses of the Committee at any time.

Good morning, and welcome to today's hearing titled ''Urban Air Mobility—Are Flying Cars Ready for Take-Off?'' I'll recognize myself for five minutes for an opening statement, but before beginning, let me just say that we expect some Members to arrive shortly. There are both Republican and Democratic Caucus meetings going on, and as soon as those caucuses are over, I think that we'll have more Members, although this is a critical mass up here right now.

I also note the good audience interest. Nice to have everybody here and with our discussion about such a fascinating subject. And we welcome our five witnesses as well, and I'll introduce you in just a minute.

For decades, flying cars have been the object of our imagination. They represent aspiration, innovation, and freedom of exploration. The entertainment industry has popularized the concept in everything from Chitty Chitty Bang Bang to The Jetsons, from Star Wars to Back to the Future.

Let me confess to a couple of things this morning. Several weeks ago, I was taking a walk at the Mall, and I noticed a mother with a young son off to the side. It looked like to me the young son was operating a remote-controlled car, and suddenly, wings sprouted from the side of the car and the car took off. This was the first remote-controlled flying car that I've ever seen in my life. But you have to understand that I've been collecting articles about flying cars since I was in elementary school, so I was just absolutely intrigued by what I saw.

I have to say I immediately sent off for one. I flew it in Lincoln Park several weeks ago, and it worked wonderfully. The advantage of this particular remote-controlled car—flying-car plane—is that it flies so slowly you can sort of you can't do much about vertical, but that's okay. It goes so slowly, it doesn't seem to matter.

I also liked it so much that I want to tell Members that I ordered a number of these flying cars. I know a good thing when I see it. Every Member who comes to today's hearing is going to get a flying car, and I am going to show it. This is what the box looks like, and, more specifically, this is what the car looks like when the wings have popped out. This can take off in 15 feet. I could've taken it off on the witness table, but I decided not to because I don't think I could have made the turn before it hit the wall. And I know what everybody would have said if that had happened.

So, in any case, as far as the Members go, we'll be delivering a box to your office sometime today or tomorrow. And I've also promised these flying car models to all the witnesses today, we'll just have to figure out how you get it back if you're not from the DC. area, but we'll figure that out.

By the way, it's always been frustrating to me to be given a present that required batteries and then no batteries, so I have purchased batteries. Will get, taped on top of the model, six AA batteries so that you'll be able to use this car fairly shortly. Anyway, it will be great fun, and I think you'll enjoy it.

By the way, if you want to, be sure and let me know how you did, and if you can do, take a video. Who knows, we may have a video hearing sometime soon. So, anyway, when the word gets out, I suspect we'll have a few more Members come as well. They do have to stay for more than one minute, however.

Let's see. Oh, I want to show you examples of some of these clippings. These are more recent clippings, but the most recent clipping was actually—I'm on a plane Friday night flying back home, and I'm reading The Economist, and in The Economist this week there is an article on flying cars. It's called a ''James Bond special,'' which happens to hit two of my personal interests, both James Bond and the flying cars, but it was in this week's Economist.

Then, we have a Terrafugia witness today, and I went back and I have a clipping from 2010 on the plane that I think you're going to be selling next year. And I was not around at the time, so I don't want any comments, but back in 1945, do you recall the store JCPenney? Okay. This is an ad by JCPenney in 1945, ''buy your plane at Penney's.'' But anyway, it looked like every family was going to own an airplane back then. Obviously, it didn't happen, but that's the kind of aspiration we've had in the United States for—about this subject for a long, long time. So anyway, you can look at my clips whenever you want to.

Let's see. Our focus today is on urban air mobility, a concept that can include delivery drones and personal air vehicles, as well as cars that can both be driven and flown. And advances in lithium-ion battery technology, computing power, and electric propulsion are providing companies with the tools they need to turn science fiction into science fact. This is the first Congressional hearing dedicated to the topic of flying cars.

One company, Terrafugia, says that their vehicle could be available as soon as next year. It's called the Transition and can drive like a car, fit into a standard garage, and be flown in and out of over 5,000 local airports. And Uber has a bold timeline to make an air-based on-demand transportation system available to the public in five years. Companies like Bell are working to design and build the vehicles that will operate on the network envisioned by Uber.

Autonomous cars, which are impressive and already have been the subject of Science Committee hearings, don't have the same benefits as urban air mobility. Traffic and gridlock challenges are better overcome by cars that fly rather than drive. Flying cars also have the benefit of enabling emergency vehicles to reach their destinations faster and provide more mobility options for those who cannot operate a car.

Although it will be a while before we see widespread ownership and use of personal vehicles that can both be driven and flown, these advances are visible on the horizon. As policymakers, we can examine how we can support such technological advances while pursuing a safe, reliable, and efficient regulatory framework.

It occurs to me that we're the first committee in Congress to have a hearing on flying cars, but remember, we were also the first committee to have a hearing on drones and several other subjects as well, so that's one of the things that we are about in the Science Committee, the future and innovation.

We thank our witnesses for being here today, and I look forward to the day when I can fly a flying car.

[The prepared statement of Chairman Smith follows:]

Statement by Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas)

Urban Air Mobility - Are Flying Cars Ready for Take-Off?

Chairman Smith: For decades, flying cars have been the object of our imagination. They represent aspiration, innovation and the freedom of exploration.

The entertainment industry has popularized the concept in everything from Chitty Chitty Bang Bang to The Jetsons, from Star Wars to Back to the Future.

Several weeks ago, I was walking on the Mall and noticed a boy operating a remote-control flying car—the first one I've ever seen. I immediately sent off for one and flew it recently with a young friend. It exceeded my expectations.

In fact, I liked it so much that I ordered one for each of our witnesses today and for all the Members who attend this hearing.

I've been keeping articles about flying cars since I was in elementary school. Here are some from the last few years.

Just this week there was an article about flying cars in the Economist that also mentioned James Bond, so it covered two personal interests!

Our focus today is on Urban Air Mobility (UAM), a concept that can include delivery drones and personal air vehicles as well as cars that can both be driven and flown. (That's different than flying down the highway at high speeds.)

Advances in lithium-ion battery technology, computing power and electric propulsion are providing companies with the tools they need to turn science fiction into science fact.

This is the first congressional hearing dedicated to the topic of flying cars. One company, Terrafugia, says that their vehicle could be available as soon as next year. It's called the Transition and can drive like a car, fit into a standard garage, and be flown in and out of over 5,000 local airports.


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